BOOKS

Janine Kitson

Jack's Worry

By Sam Zuppardi, Walker Books, 2016.

This delightful K-2 picture book tells the story of Jack and his eagerness to perform at his first-ever concert. On the morning of the concert, however, he is beset with “Worry”, personified into a monster that grows more powerful by the minute. Jack breaks down in tears and tells his mother he no longer wants to perform at the concert. His mother comforts him with beautiful words: “The concert isn’t about playing perfectly. It’s about having fun and sharing something you love with people who love you.” With these comforting words Jack not only has the courage to overcome his own fears but able to help his friends overcome their worries too. The upbeat ending reassures the reader that we all have worries but we also have the power to overcome them.

Harry Miller’s Run

By David Almond, Illustrated by Salvatore Rubbino, Walker Books, 2015.

Eleven-year-old Liam doesn’t want to waste his time visiting “ancient” Harry Miller because he wants to prepare for the Junior Great North Marathon but his mother insists that they visit Harry before the elderly man moves into a nursing home. By the end of the visit, Liam leaves with insights from this wise old man who is facing the end of his life.

Harry shares his memory of one wonderful and glorious day when, as an 11-year-old, he ran his own marathon all the way from Newcastle, England to the sea with his friends.

This joyous day of achievement finishes with the unexpected delicious treat of an ice-cream, a luxury for children growing up during the interwar years. The day is an affirmation about the values of the simple pleasures of life: achievement, friendship and kindness.

The novel is a great historical resource about the value of young people listening to the stories of older folk. In this case we hear an inspiring story that encourages us to live life to the full and treasure acts of kindness.

The House That Jack Built

Jack Mundey Green Bans Hero
by James Colman Pascoe
Newsouth, 2016

This book celebrates Jack Mundey’s and the Builders Labourers’ Federation’s (BLF) achievements in saving so much of Sydney’s heritage and environment during the 1970s.

It is particularly timely when legislation to protect heritage and the environment are being severely wound back — at a time when we are experiencing the threats of a climate emergency.

The book exposes the greed that the privatisation agenda pushes when it transfers community ownership over to the big end of town and thus diminishes the wellbeing of future generations.

The book celebrates Jack Mundey and the BLF’s many achievements to save Sydney’s The Rocks, Glebe, and Woolloomooloo. Kelly’s Bush, at Hunters Hill, is now recognised by the international environmental movement for being the place where the world’s first green ban took place.

Jack Mundey brought the enlightened working class and enlightened middle class together to demand heritage and environment protections for the places we enjoy today.

He also eloquently argued for the need for jobs that would not destroy the future generations' right to a beautiful world. This is a wonderful history that all Australians need to read.

All three books are available at Federation Library.

Janine Kitson is a Federation Life Member

Classroom activities

Jack’s Worry
English K-6 Syllabus
STAGE 1
Volume 1, page 56, 58, 75

SPEAKING AND LISTENING 1

Outcome

A student:

  • communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations EN1-1A

Content

Students:

Develop and apply contextual knowledge

  • understand that language varies when people take on different roles in social and classroom interactions and how the use of key interpersonal language resources varies depending on context (ACELA1461)
  • listens for specific purposes and information and extend students own and others’ ideas in discussions (ACELY1666)

Responds to and compose texts

  • engage in conversations and discussions, using active listening behaviours, showing interest, and contributing ideas, information and questions (ACELY1656)
  • use role-play and drama to represent familiar events and characters in texts
  • formulate open and closed questions appropriate to the context
  • use some persuasive language to express a point of view
  • contribute appropriately to class discussions

Small group/pair discussion

  1. Have you ever felt worried about performing at a concert?

Suggestions for learning activities:

  1. In groups of three, link arms and hands and act out "Worry"
  2. Act the story.
  3. Act out a new story where children are worried about giving a talk or performing a play or ...

WRITING AND REPRESENTING 1

Outcome

A student:

  • plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers EN1-2A

Content

Students:

Develop and apply contextual knowledge

  • understand how planning, composing and reviewing contribute to effective imaginative, information and persuasive texts

Understand and apply knowledge of language forms and features

  • create short imaginative, informative and persuasive texts using growing knowledge of text structures and language features for familiar and some less familiar audiences, selecting print and multimodal elements appropriate to the audience and purpose (ACELY1661, ACELY1671)

Respond to and compose texts

  • plan, composes and review simple imaginative, informative and persuasive texts on familiar topics
  • draw on personal experience and topic knowledge to express opinions in writing
  • experiment with publishing using different modes and media to enhance planned presentations

Suggestions for learning activities:

  1. Write a list of "worry" words and "brave" words.
  2. Imagine you are Jack. Write about the day of the concert.

EXPRESSING THEMSELVES

A student:

  • Responds to and composes a range of texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences EN1-11D

Content

Students:

Engage personally with texts

  • Recognise and begin to understand that their own experiences helps shape their response to and enjoyment of texts
  • share picture books and digital stories for enjoyment and pleasure

Understand and apply knowledge of language forms and features

  • discuss aspects of imaginative texts, such as setting and dialogue, making connections with students’ own experiences

Respond to and compose texts

  • compose simple print, visual and digital texts that depecit aspects of their own experience
  • discuss characters and events in a range of literary texts and share personal responses to these texts, making connections with students’ own experiences

Small group/pair discussion

  1. What advice can you give to others about when they feel worried?

Suggestions for learning activities:

  1. Divide a sheet into two. On one side use colour crayons to express "worry". On the other side use colours to express "overcoming worry".

Harry Miller’s Run
Geography K-6 Syllabus
STAGE 3
Volume 1, page 64-65

A DIVERSE AND CONNECTED WORLD

Outcomes

A student:

  • describes the diverse features and characteristics of places and environments GE3-1
  • explains interactions and connections between people, places and environments GE3-2
  • acquires, processes and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry GE3-4

Key inquiry questions

  • How do places, people and cultures differ across the world?
  • How do people’s connections to places affect their perception of them?

Content focus

Students explore . . . the connections Australia has with other countries across the world. Student learn about the diversity of the world’s people . . . Students will explore and reflect upon similarities and differences and the importance of intercultural understand.

Content

The world’s cultural diversity

Students:

investigate the world’s cultural diversity . . . for example: (ACHGK033)

  • Examination of various cultures eg customs, beliefs, social organisation

Global connections

Students:

Investigate connections between Australia and other countries of the world, for example: (ACHGK034, ACHGH035)

  • Examination of a significant event and its local, regional and global effect on people and places eg sporting or cultural event

Connections shape perceptions

Students:

investigate how connections influence people’s perceptions and understanding of places, for example: (ACHGK036)

  • Identification of factors that influence people’s perception of places e.g. history
  • Discussion of the effect of generalisations and stereotypes about places

Small group/pair discussion

  1. Describe Harry’s life growing up in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne in England.
  2. How is Harry’s life different to your life?

Suggestions for learning activities:

  1. Draw a map of the places in the book.
  2. Interview an older person about where they lived as a young person.
The House that Jack Built, Jack Mundey Greens Bans Hero
History Years 7-10 Syllabus
STAGE 5
Volume 2, PAGE 84

TOPIC 5B: THE ENVIRONMENT MOVEMENT (1960s - PRESENT)

The growth and influence of the environment movement within Australia and overseas, and developments in the ideas about the environment (ACDSEH126)

Students:

  • Discuss key events in the growing awareness of environmental issues in Australia and the world before 1975
  • Outline the origins and polices of green political parties in the 1980s
  • describe the influence of at least ONE of the following environmental ideas:
    • Limits to growth

Significant events and campaigns that contributed to popular awareness of environmental issues

Students:

  • Outline the important developments in at least one environmental event and campaign

The House that Jack Built is an excellent resource for Depth Study 5.