IN BRIEF

Food and fibre lessons
The Australian Egg Corporation launched an interactive website to educate primary school children about the importance of farmers and how food arrives from the farm to their plate. A national survey that found little knowledge about food and fibre and the resources were developed to address these worrying results. There are interactive games, videos, music and lesson plans linked to the Australian Curriculum to teach children about healthy food choices. The resources, approved by Education Services Australia, can be found on www.scootle.edu.au, the national digital learning resource network portal housing more than 18,000 resources for teachers, and www.allabouteggs.com.au.

Mark Anti-Poverty Week
Teachers are being asked by the AEU to consider making an opportunity for students to take part in activities supporting Anti-Poverty Week, October 12–18. In particular, the APW organisers have asked schools to consider using the pamphlet “Social Inclusion at School: How to Help Low-Income Families” during APW. A range of resources to support activities are available on the AEU federal website at which shows teachers how to obtain hard copies and bulk copies of various materials (posters, postcard and the “Social Inclusion” pamphlet).

Kinship website to understand Aboriginal culture

School teachers are encouraged to make use of a website explaining traditional social structures and relationships between Aboriginal people, developed by the University of Sydney for its students. Kinship was developed by senior lecturer Lynette Riley who for 25 years has taught kinship courses at universities and TAFEs and to teachers, police, lawyers and judges. “This module … provides information our students need to know if they are to work successfully with Aboriginal communities and teach future generations,” said Ms Riley. Short videos explain concepts such as Nations, Clans and Family Groups; Language; Affiliations; and Moiety (the principle of everything and everyone being made up of two halves which must come together in order to achieve harmony). There are also community narratives where Aboriginal people tell stories of how cultural differences can lead to misunderstandings with doctors, lawyers and other professional practitioners with whom they have regular dealings.

Read Australian
Teachers of English and media can use free online teaching resources to support Australian authors and books in the classroom. The Reading Australia website, set up by the non-profit Copyright Agency, has 200 books to date, and teaching resources for 21 of them (10 primary, 11 secondary). “Term 3 is traditionally the time for teachers to choose the novels and other texts their students will explore in 2014,” said Copyright Agency spokeswoman Zoe Rodriguez. “We want teachers and librarians to teach Australian stories.” The resources cover old and new classics such as Shaun Tan’s The Arrival, Tim Winton’s Cloudstreet, Melina Marchetta’s Looking for Alibrandi, Sonya Hartnett’s The Silver Donkey and Meme McDonald’s and Boori Monty Pryor’s My Girragundji. A survey of 200 teachers rated the resources as high in quality.

Early 20th century Sydney conservationists
Learn about famous conservationists who banded with others to shape many of the policies and reforms from 1900–1960 that created the parkland, bushland, national parks and open spaces we enjoy today in Sydney. Discover how individuals including wildlife campaigner David G. Stead, fitness advocate Charles Bean, environmental educator Thistle Harris and National Trust (NSW) founder Annie Wyatt contributed to the environment movement. This WEA course, conducted with the National Parks Association of NSW, is on Saturday August 23 from 10am–noon at WEA, Sydney, 70–72 Bathurst St, Sydney, cost: $38. Bookings essential — contact WEA through its website or call (02) 9264 278 and quote course no: 43WK090.

Watch and learn from by the beach

On August 13, Transition Bondi is putting on the documentary, In Transition 2.0 as part of its weekly film and feast for the environment on Wednesdays from 7-9pm at the Chapel by the Sea, 95 Roscoe Street, Bondi Beach. The film charts the evolution of the Transition Towns movement from its humble origins in Kinsale, Ireland to an international movement, showing that when hands are joined, anything is possible. Transition Bondi is part of the Transition Town network, focusing on community initiatives ranging from community gardens to low-carbon energy and transport systems.